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Multinational Maritime Operations   Tags: maritime, maritime operations, multinational maritime operations  

Multinational operations are operations conducted by forces of two or more nations, usually undertaken within the structure of a coalition or alliance. This guide is a compendium of selected resources for the study of multinational maritime operations
Last Updated: Jul 25, 2013 URL: http://usnwc.libguides.com/Multinational_Maritime_Operations Print Guide RSS Updates

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Welcome!

  

Today's transnational threats have the potential to inflict great harm on many nations.  In this ambiguous security environment, responding to these unpredictable and transnational threats requires teamwork to prevent attacks, protect people and infrastructure, minimize damage, and expedite recovery. It necessitates the integration and alignment of all maritime security programs and initiatives into a far-reaching and unified national effort.
 

 

Contact

Professor John Mangold

College of Operational and Strategic Leadership (COSL)
Operational Level Programs (OLP)
Director, Maritime Staff Operators Course (MSOC)

If you have any additional resources, please contact, Professor John Mangold.

 

Introduction

This LibGuide is a compendium of selected resources for the study of multinational maritime operations. Links to articles, books,  and other resources will be continuously updated to keep pace with the ever expanding research in the area of multinational maritime operations. Likewise, this LibGuide will help one maximize the use of digital-age research technology available at the Naval War College.

 

What is Multinational Operations?

"Multinational operations are operations conducted by forces of two or more nations, usually undertaken within the structure of a coalition or alliance. Other possible arrangements include supervision by an intergovernmental organization (IGO) such as the United Nations (UN) or the Organization for Security and Cooperation in Europe. Commonly used terms under the multinational rubric include allied, bilateral, coalition, combined, combined/coalition or multilateral. However, within this publication the term multinational will be the term used to describe these actions."

Multinational Operations Joint Publication 3-16

 

Multinational Maritime Operations-Concept

"We will evolve and establish international relationships to increase
security and achieve common interests in the maritime domain.
We continue to work closely with our allies and international partners
around the world in wargames, exercises, and operations."

Executing the Maritime Strategy-CNO Guidance for 2011

"Today's transnational threats have the potential to inflict great harm on
many nations. Thus, the security of the maritime domain requires
comprehensive and cohesive efforts among the United States and many
cooperating nations to protect the common interest in global maritime
security. The National Strategy for Maritime Security describes how the
United States Government will promote an international maritime security
effort that will effectively and efficiently enhance the security of the
maritime domain while preserving the freedom of the domain for legitimate pursuits."

National Strategy for Maritime Security, 2005

"Because the maritime domain-the world's oceans, seas, bays, estuaries,islands, coastal areas, littorals, and the airspace above them-supports 90% of the world's trade, it carries the lifeblood of a global system that links every country on earth."

A Cooperative Strategy for 21st Century Seapower, October 2007

"NOC 10 articulates the ways naval forces are employed to achieve the strategy conveyed in CS-21. Published in 2007, CS-21 described a set of core capabilities that added maritime security and humanitarian assistance and disaster response (HA/DR) to the traditional forward presence, deterrence, sea control, and power projection."

Navy Operations Concept, 2010

 

Disclamer

Material and external links contained herein are made available for the purpose of peer review and discussion and do not necessarily reflect the views of the Naval War College, Department of the Navy or the Department of Defense.

 

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