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Revolution in Military Affairs   Tags: military affairs, revolution in military affairs, rma  

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Last Updated: May 9, 2014 URL: http://usnwc.libguides.com/content.php?pid=73320 Print Guide RSS Updates

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Definition of RMA

" A Revolution in Military Affairs is a major change in the nature of warfare, brought about by the innovative application of new technologies which, combined with dramatic changes in military doctrine and operational and organizational concepts, fundamentally alters the character and conduct of war.  The Revolution in Military Affairs consists of four new warfare areas:  Information Warfare, Precision Strike, Dominating Manuver, and Space Warfare."

 

Program for Joint Education (PJE):  Academic Year 1996.  U.S. Army War College, Carlisle Barracks, PA

 

 

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About RMA

In 1973, Andrew W. Marshall was appointed as the first director, Office of the Secretary of Defense / Net Assessment (OSD / NA), the Pentagon’s internal think tank.  Interested in the concept of Revolution in Military Affairs (RMA), first developed by Soviet Armed Forces member Marshal Nikolai Ogarkov, Marshall and the OSD / NA have been leading the research into the theory that defines the RMA as occurring:

when technological change makes possible the introduction of new materiel that when combined with organizational and operational change, results in fundamental change in the conduct of warfare.  What is important is not the speed with which a revolution takes place, but rather the magnitude of the change itself.

 Thomas, J. Welch, Associate Director for Science and Technology

Office of Net Assessment

(http://www.ndu.edu/inss/books/Books%20%201997/Strength%20Through%20Cooperation%201997/stcch6.html)

 

 

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